ABSTRACT NUMBER - 101

CEREBRAL VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF CHILDREN ATTENDING THE PAEDIATRIC LOW VISION CLINIC, QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA


Matthew Cranstoun, Jennifer Bevan, Anne Lamont, Bronwyn Hein, Glen Gole, Peter Cranstoun

Meeting:  2012 RANZCO


SESSION INFORMATION

Date:      -

Session Title: POSTER ABSTRACTS

Session Time:      -

Purpose:
To review a cohort of children with a primary diagnosis of cerebral visual impairment (CVI) attending the Paediatric Low Vision Clinic in Queensland.

Methods:
A retrospective chart review of 168 chil-dren with a diagnosis of Cerebral Visual Impairment seen at the Paediatric Low Vision Clinic in Queensland between 1995 and 2011 was performed to determine the nature & frequency of co-morbidities, causes, asso-ciated clinical features & visual outcomes.

Results:
he largest subgroup (29%) of children referred to the PLVC during the period of our study was comprised of children diagnosed as suffering from CVI. 111 (66%) of our cohort of 168 children were males. The most common co-morbidities were epi-lepsy (67%) & cerebral palsy (48%). A wide variety of causes was identified with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury (39%), CNS infections (14%) and congenital CNS malformations (16%) occurring most frequently. While children with CVI may have a normal eye examination, optic atrophy (30%), strabismus (55%), nystagmus (22%) & field defects (19%) were common associated clinical findings in our group. 145 (86%) of children examined had a visual acuity of 6/60 or worse.

Conclusion:
CVI is the commonest cause of decreased visual acuity in the paediatric age group in developed countries. In the majority of children in our study, CVI was associated with systemic diseases particularly cer-ebral palsy & epilepsy. While reduced vision can occur in a setting of a normal ocular examination, optic atrophy, strabismus & sensory nystagmus are frequent clinical findings.