ABSTRACT NUMBER - 1

OCULAR CHLAMYDIA: A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL REVIEW


Bob Wang, Adam Rudkin, Paul Badenoch, Geoff Higgins, Dinesh Selva

Meeting:  2010 RANZCO


SESSION INFORMATION

Date: 23 Nov 2010

Session Title: FREE PAPERS

Session Time: 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Purpose:
The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of laboratory-confirmed chlamydial ocular disease. Specifically, we describe the incidence and associated clinical characteristics of adult inclusion conjunctivitis (AIC), chlamydial ophthalmia neonato-rum (CON), and trachoma.

Method:
The pathology records at two tertiary teach-ing hospitals in South Australia were investigated. The study includes all patients in which chlamydia was detected in a conjunctival specimen (direct immu-nofluorescence, culture or PCR) between January 2000 and June 2009. Case records were reviewed retrospectively.

Results:
64 patients were identified. 55 were diag-nosed with AIC, 9 with CON and none with trachoma. The median age of patients was 22 years (range: 14 to 56 years) for AIC and 15 days (range: 7 to 35 days) for CON. The average duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 17.3 days for AIC and 8.3 days for CON. For AIC, 15% of the patients had bilateral involve-ment, 85% had follicular conjunctivitis, 47% had sub-epithelial infiltrates, 38% had superficial punctate keratitis, and 17% had pre-auricular lymphadenopa-thy. All patients with CON were delivered vaginally and 22% were preterm. All were afebrile at diagnosis and 67% had bilateral involvement.

Conclusion:
In our study, the most common mani-festation of ocular chlamydia was AIS and there were no identified cases of active trachoma. A persisting follicular conjunctivitis was the most common pre-senting feature of AIS.