ABSTRACT NUMBER - S3009

3D CELL PRINTING AND CORNEAL EPITHELIAL REGENERATION USING A NOVEL BIOINK (IFIXINK)


Hannah Frazer1, Jingjing You1,2, Chris Hodge3,4, Con Petsoglou1,4,5, Pierre Georges4, Adam Taylor6, Gordon Wallace6, Gerard Sutton1,3,4

Meeting:  2018 RANZCO


SESSION INFORMATION

Date:      -

Session Title: FREE PAPERS: Rapid Fire Presentations – Cornea

Session Time:      -

Purpose: Corneal injuries represent the most com- mon ophthalmic emergency presentation in Australia. We have previously developed a novel bioink (iFixInk) that is transparent, biocompatible, biodegradable, 3D-printable and sets in 2 minutes, and have shown that it promotes wound healing in an in vitro model. We aimed to test this in an ex vivo model and its ability to act as a cell carrier. Methods: Ulcerated corneas were debrided and sus- pended in organ culture media. iFixInk was extruded onto the debrided surface at days 1 and 4 (n = 3). The corneas were fixed at day 7, cryosec- tioned and compared to control ulcerated corneas kept in the same conditions but not to the iFixInk (n = 3). The sections were stained with H&E to examine for epithelial morphology.
P18 HCET cells were trypsinised and suspended in the iFixInk and extruded in a petri dish. Another layer was then extruded orthogonally on top. Hoechst and Propidium Iodide live-dead staining were performed at 2 and 72 hours post extrusion and analyzed using Image J.
Results: Epithelial regeneration was observed in iFixInk treated corneas and not in the controls. HCET cells exhibited over 90% cell viability post extrusion and can be printed into distinct, stackable layers.
Conclusion: These preliminary results demonstrate that iFixInk can be used for cell-printing and encourages wound-healing in an ex vivo model. This could potentially serve as a treatment for cor- neal injuries, increase the pool of suitable donor cor- neas and also serve as a foundation for 3D printing artificial corneas in the future.

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