ABSTRACT NUMBER - 138

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF UVEITIS IN METROPOLITAN MELBOURNE


Colby T Hart, Elena Zhu, Carmel Crock, Sophie Rogers, Lyndell L Lim

Meeting:  2017 RANZCO


SESSION INFORMATION

Date:      -

Session Title: UVEITIS - Poster Abstracts

Session Time:      -

Purpose: To determine the incidence and prevalence of uveitis in a large, well-deftned population of metropolitan Melbourne through a retrospective, cross-sectional study.
Methods: The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital (RVEEH) is a quaternary referral hospital with the only dedicated ophthalmology emergency department (ED) in the State of Victoria. Data regarding all patients who presented to the RVEEH ED with a diagnostic code related to uveitis, and all patients who attended a specialist uveitis clinic at the RVEEH, from November 2014 through October 2015 were col- lected and reviewed by two health professionals. Incidence and prevalence rates were calculated based on detailed gender- and age-stratifted population data obtained in the 2015 Government census for metro-politan Melbourne.
Results: The adult population of metropolitan Melbourne used for the study was 1 174 302 people. During the study period, 620 new cases of uveitis were diagnosed and 425 cases of pre-existing uveitis requiring treatment were identifted. These data yielded an incidence of 52.80/100 000 person years and a period prevalence of 88.99/100 000 persons. Of the 1045 cases identifted, anterior uveitis was diagnosed in 792 patients (75.8%), intermediate uveitis in 54 patients (5.2%), posterior uveitis in 154 patients (14.7%) and panuveitis in 45 patients (4.3%). At the time of presentation, 297 patients (28.4%) had a diagnosed associated autoimmune condition and 147 patients (14.1%) had an infec- tious aetiology.
Conclusion: In this ftrst uveitis epidemiology study in an Australian metropolitan population, the incidence and prevalence values were similar to those rates reported in recent U.S. studies. The majority of patients requiring treatment for uveitis were young and of working age.

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